Colocation Results on Film Industry

The importance of colocation on the film and entertainment industry is quite apparent for it gives it more visibility and increases its overall output to viewers. It also expands servers of small scale entertainment businesses by bringing them to a stronger and wider bandwidth making it easy to control the many aspects of the IT infrastructure demanded by the popular industry. These include, making studios more accessible online by virtue of the stronger Internet connectivity. The other effect is the saving of time and power required to produce programs because of the little manpower requirements brought about by this technology.

Some of the most important results of the technology on the film industry are that it maintains the power all the time and this reduces the effects of losing copies of programs undergoing filming. Michigan colocation through its web hosting utilizes extra power sources to make sure that even when there is power outage the server keeps running on. This minimizes the loss of data which usually happens when abrupt blackout occurs. This backup is essential for an entertainer who relies on their servers to display their shows on the screen that needs to be on, all the time.

On another facet, using Michigan colocation incorporates the right environment for the functioning of the equipment. If the work is being done at home, the computer is given backup on both the power and connection aspects. The building too, if it is a theater for example, also gains a refreshing background with the air conditioning that is done inside the room. This is very essential to compromise on the overheating that might happen to heavy duty electronic gear. This can act as a good environment for not only the proper utility of the equipment but as a conducive background for the audience in a film theater.

On top of that, colocation ensures that there is effective and dynamic communication. This is very essential in the film industry where many people such as directors, talents and producers need to communicate regularly from disparate locations. On a normal situation this may block some communication channels, but with this technology, the telecommunication devices give a wide bandwidth to the frequencies used by such a company thus allowing fast transmission and feedback of information. The use of Ethernet communication on the other hand as given by the service provider, makes it possible to connect cities in near fiber optic proportions, which is convenient for arranging events simultaneously without having to go to the locale itself.

This also facilitates the lowering of costs that may be used for troubleshooting computer problems and paying a regular bill for Internet connection. All this is provided by the service provider who not only gives the essential electronic equipment, but also offers other service on top. These may include keeping the equipment safe and secure in a natural environment.

Rich Heritage of Indian Films

Indian film industry is one of most popular industry that serves as a vehicle to showcase cultural, moral, and social beliefs. Since centuries Indian films have been recognized worldwide for their excellent direction, great script, superb acting, outstanding choreography, and heart warming songs. The early movies ushered in Hindi, Tamil, Telugu, and Bengali language but now the entire gamut of language and culture is heard and reflected in Indian movies.

Indian film industry, also known as Bollywood, has its origin in the city of Bombay which is now known as Mumbai. The city is considered to be a hometown of many popular actors who have made a special place for themselves in the hearts of millions of people around the world. The city of Mumbai gave birth to the rich heritage of Indian films on July 7, 1896 when Lumiere Brothers screened six short films. After the success of these films, many more foreign films invaded India.

Over the period of time the industry witnessed huge changes and development that further led to the first Indian-made film, Raja Harischandra, in 1913. This great film was produced and directed by Dadasaheb Phalke who took the industry to new heights. Thereafter, many other films were introduced in this era and were based on mythological, devotional, and historical concepts. Amazingly, all these movies were silent movies, movies without words, where the actors used to express all through their actions.

Over the period of time, this source of entertainment became more and more popular and people started taking interest in the film industry. Later in 1931, movie Alam Ara was released that was the first Indian talkie, the first Indian movie with sound. This movie created a new benchmark in the industry and pushed to the growth of Indian cinemas to great heights.

The 1950s is considered to be the golden era of Indian films, a period that saw the emergence of great artists including Raj Kapoor, Guru Dutt, Meena Kumari, Madhubala, Dilip Kumar, Bimal Roy, and Satyajit Ray. Along with these great artists, some of the most recognized singers, composers, directors, producers, scrip writers, and choreographers created some of the best movies that are still known to be popular among the masses.

Later on, in the 1970s, some of the great superstars like Amitabh Bachchan, Tanuja, Asha Parekh, Shabana Azmi, Smita Patil, Om Puri, and Nasrudin Shah entered the film industry. These great artists have carved their own niche in the golden heritage of Indian films. Gradually, more and more movies were introduced as a source of entertainment and subsequently religious films in various Indian languages were making their presence in the industry.

Further ahead, the industry also witnessed the entry of romantic films in the 1990s. This entry of romance and love in the movies rejuvenated the entire industry. It was a time of mixed genre that was infused with the growing technology. The infusion of movies and technologies was explored by the present day artists like Shahrukh Khan, Hrithik Roshan, Madhuri Dixit, Sridevi, Kajol, and many more. With this, a new wave of film makers began to release variety of films of different subjects.

Today, with pride and honor, Indians can say that the iconic Indian film industry has passed through 11 decades of entertainment that encompass a range of mind blowing songs, beautiful locations, talented artists, and love in the air.

Difficulties Implementing Technology Threatens Industry

It’s no secret that new types of technology can create problems, but apparently HDTV has created some unforeseen problems with consequences that could be surprisingly far reaching. The problem that HDTV has created is namely the fact that many local TV stations are refusing to let satellite TV companies and cable TV companies use their HDTV signals without paying for them.

According to federal law TV providers can’t use the content from local TV stations without permission. And historically, that permission has been granted to sat casters and cable TV companies in exchange for some pretty nominal fees or for promotional consideration.

HDTV has changed that. Instead of providing HDTV signals in the same way that standard def signals have been provided in the past local TV stations- and in many cases that large companies that own a bunch of TV stations- are now demanding significantly more money in exchange for their content. Some figures estimate that TV stations want up to fifty cents for every household that their content is provided to. While this may not sound like much money, when you multiply it by all of the households that the content is supplied to and figure that several stations in any given market are requesting similar amounts of money, that adds up to a pretty significant sum.

The extra money that the TV stations and the companies that own them want is supposedly justified by the fact that HDTV programming costs more to produce than standard def programming. That’s because of the fact that sets for HDTV need to be built bigger in order to accommodate the wider viewing area of the High Def camera, and HD programming requires new and expensive equipment for the filming and editing of HDTV programming. Even local stations have to make upgrades in order to broadcast their news programs and any other local programs in High Def. Of course the other angle of this request for more money could also be attributed to the growing corporate trend of trying to milk profit whenever and wherever possible.

Of course the cable TV and satellite TV companies are trying to resist this any way that they can. They say that they don’t have the obligation to pay in order to carry the channel for two reasons. First, they never have in the past, and second, that same program content is available over the air for free so why should they- and by extension their subscribers- pay for that same content.

Many industry insiders are crying foul about this whole problem though for several reason. (And these are the farther reaching consequences mentioned earlier.) For one thing, many people are claiming that because the subscription services aren’t providing these channels, the subscribers can’t get their local channels. (This seems like a weak argument because, as already pointed out, those channels are already available over the air for free. Apparently the subscribers in question are too lazy to set up an antenna. And if they can’t receive the signals with an antenna, then it’s debatable whether or not those channels are really local for them anyway!) The other major problem is that there’s a fear that if people can’t get their local channels, then they won’t be satisfied with their HDTV sets and then won’t recommend the sets to their friends. That in turn will slow down sales of the sets and jeopardize the planned conversion to digital TV in 2009.